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“A Match for Death” is a New Myth

by Tony Palmieri

by Tony Palmieri, The Otherwhere: https://www.instagram.com/the.otherwhere/

Do you need someone to read you a story in these turbulent times? What if some actors did it, radio-play style?

Life is nurturing and open-minded, but this is too much: her son, Death, is destroying everything she’s worked for. Her colleagues agree he needs to leave the nest. Maybe they can set him up with somebody…

“A Match for Death” by Briana Una McGuckin airs on SpotLight Radio June 4th (12:30pm EST & 6:30pm EST) and June 6th (1:30am EST & 1:30pm EST).

In CT, tune into WLIS/WMRD: 1420AM/1150AM

Or stream here from everywhere: https://www.wliswmrd.net/

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It’s Women in Horror Month!

…Which means, it’s time to talk about NOT ALL MONSTERS, an anthology of horror by women writers compiled by the wonderful, Stoker Award-winning Sara Tantlinger (with cover and interior art by Don Noble). Every week in February, Sara’s hosting a round-table on her blog — asking the authors who have written for NOT ALL MONSTERS questions about their stories!

Everything sounds so rich, I’m excited to be in such good company. And as for me, well, “‘The Good Will’ envisions an after-life in which gods are dress-forms and the soul is a quilt…” Read the full inspiration for this and other stories here!

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This is the Best-Case Scenario

There were poinsettias everywhere, because the church was still decorated for Christmas, and my dad was in a box. We were singing “The Lord is My Shepherd” – my aunt, my uncles, my cousins, my husbands, and me – and my dad was in a box. I was kneeling with my head bowed while the rest all filed up to receive the Eucharist, because I am not Confirmed but – also – because my dad was in a box.

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Fine Motor Skills, Magic, and the WestConn M.F.A

I have never been good with my hands. It’s the cerebral palsy. There is no middle ground, for me, between the over-hard, stress-red clench of a pen and a tentative, trembling touch. So that I do not shake, I type too loud, and draw too dark. It’s why I never use pencil – because there’s no point even trying to erase my lines.

I need the force of purpose connecting me to pen and pen to paper – like a completed circuit through which lightning passes. Have you ever been electrocuted? I have. You get locked in by the current. I need to be steadied like that, at the writing desk.

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Taking a Stab at “Starting from Solitude” (An Exercise for Memoirists)

This week, I shared a writing exercise with my writer’s group. It’s called “Starting from Solitude,” and it was developed by Richard Hoffman. It’s intended for memoir writing, and it’s unique in that it organically gets the writer back into her own head at a (probably rough) moment in her life. Working as a sort of guided writing meditation, it sneaks up on the writer, allowing her to wade into the past, rediscovering almost-forgotten details, piece by piece, until she finds she is submerged. She is there again, entirely.

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Where Your Story Ends: Finding Memoir’s Fault Lines in MacIlvey’s Trapped

(IMAGE CREDIT: Marco Michelini via FREEIMAGES.COM)

At a red light, once upon an icy evening, Mom and I watched as a woman on a motorcycle tipped over. The immediate fear, of course, was that she was hurt – if not from the bike falling on her leg, then from her head hitting the pavement.

“Call 9-1-1,” Mom said, throwing the car into park and handing me her cell phone, before running to help.

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